The Early Modern Colloquium

A Graduate Student-Run Interest Group at the University of Michigan

 

PAGE LINKS
2009-2010
2008-2009
2007-2008
2006-2007
2005-2006
2004-2005
2003-2004
2002-2003
2001-2002
2000-2001
1999-2000

 

Past EMC Schedules

2011-2012:

Compiling annals. Please check back with us in week or two. Thank you.

2010-2011:

Compiling annals. Please check back with us in a week or two. Thank you.

2009-2010:

MONDAY, OCTOBER 5th, 2009, 4-5:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Bruce Holsinger (English and Music, University of Virginia) presents a lecture entitled: "Liturgy, Latinity, and the Prosaic: The Case of William Caxton." Bruce Holsinger is Professor of English and Music and Associate Dean for Humanities and the Arts at the University of Virginia. Professor Holsinger, who received both his B.A. and his B.Mus.A. from the University of Michigan, is one of this institution's most distinguished scholarly alumni. His monographs include Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer (2001); The Premodern Condition: Medievalism and the Making of Theory (2005); andNeomedievalism, Neoconservatism, and the War on Terror (2007). He has co-edited History in the Comic Mode: Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person (2007) and "The Marxist Premodern," a special issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Vol. 34, Fall 2004). Professor Holsinger has received research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Please contact Angela McClain (amariem@umich.edu) with questions.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 26th, 2009, 5-6:30pm, 3154 ANGELL HALL. Please join us for a dissertation workshop: "'To avoide that fowle blot of unthankefullnesse': London, Jerusalem, and Spenser's The Ruines of Time" by Ori Weisburg (English, University of Michigan). This chapter reads the opening poem in Spenser's Complaints in the context of a rhetorical tradition linking early modern England with Jerusalem. Writers from the late Henrican through the Elizabethan periods interpellated English subjects by warning them of the dire consequences of their "unthankefullnesse," while interjecting this same term into Christ's prophesy of Jerusalem's destruction in Luke 19. As such, they constructed a parallel between the two civilizations, employing the ancient Jewish city as a cautionary example and an historical precedent. Spenser's poem offsets the threat of this parallel through its Christological evocation of Philip Sidney's spectacular London funeral. In the poem's closing pageant, London inherits the dubious mantle of the biblical capital that spurned Christ, but endeavors to avoid repeating its predecessor's failure and doom by celebrating Sidney as an imitatio Christi. Please contact Ari Friedlander (arifried@umich.edu) with questions or to receive a pre-circulated copy of this chapter.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th, 2009, 4-5:30pm, 3154 ANGELL HALL. Bruce R. Smith (Dean's Professor of English, University of Southern California) leads a graduate student workshop discussion. Smith will present a chapter from his forthcoming book, Phenomenal Shakespeare, that uses Francis Bacon, Rene Descartes, and Edmund Husserl to assert the possibility of using phenomenology to interpret early modern texts. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Please contact Andrew Bozio (bozio@umich.edu) to receive a copy of the chapter.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th, 2009, 4-5:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Bruce R. Smith (Dean's Professor of English, University of Southern California) presents a lecture entitled "Fuzzy Logic is Not an Insult: How Shakespeare's Sonnets Challenge Cognitive Theory". Smith's talk is drawn from his forthcoming book Phenomenal Shakespeare. A prolific and inflential critic, Professor Smith's other books include Homosexual Desire in Shakespeare's England: A Cultural Poetics (1991), The Acoustic World of Early Modern England:Attending to the O-Factor (1999), Shakespeare and Masculinity (2000), and, most recently, The Key of Green: Passion and Perception in Renaissance Culture (2009). Please contact Andrew Bozio (bozio@umich.edu) with any questions.

FRIDAY, JANURARY 29th, 2010, 1-2:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Please join the Early Modern Colloquium as it welcomes presentations by Aaron McCollough (English, University of Michigan) and Shana Kimball (Publications Manger in the Scholarly Publishing Office at the University of Michigan Library). Aaron will offer an introduction to Early English Books Online - Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP), and Shana will discuss the implications of digital culture for scholarly publication and discourse. Please contact Andrew Bozio (bozio@umich.edu) with any questions.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th, 2010, 5-6:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Marjorie Garber (William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of English and of Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard University) presents a lecture entitled "A Tale of Three Hamlets: or, Repetition and Revenge". A distinguished and prolific scholar, Professor Garber has published works on a wide variety of topics. Her monographs include: Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural Anxiety (1992); Vice Versa: Bisexuality and the Eroticism of Everyday Life (1995); Sex and Real Estate: Why We Love Houses (2000); Shakespeare After All (2004); and On Shakespeare and Modern Culture (2008). Please contact Leila Watkins (lrwatkin@gmail.com) with any questions.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19th, 2010, 4:30-6:00pm, & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th, 2010, 9:30am-6:00pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Conference: "The Renaissance Arts of Science and Nature". The keynote speakers for this event will be Laurie Shannon (English, Northwestern University), "The Natural-Historical Politics of Early Modern Genesis" and Carla Mazzio (English, SUNY Buffalo), "Shakespeare's Math". Other presentations include papers on the works of John Ford, William Harvey, John Milton, John Donne, George Puttenham, Rembrandt, and Shakespeare. This conference is free and open to the public. To see a listing of the full conference schedule, please click here. For questions or further information, please contact either Rebecca Wiseman (rwiseman@umich.edu), Kathryn Will (willkath@umich.edu) or Andrew Bozio (bozio@umich.edu).

FRIDAY, MARCH 26th, 2010, 4:30-6:00, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Valerie Wayne (English, University of Hawai'i at Manoa) presents a lecture entitled "Cervantes & Shakespeare: Metatextualities in Don Quixote and the Late Plays." By 1613, Shakespeare had collaborated with John Fletcher on a play called
Cardenio based on a story from Don Quixote, but how much earlier were English dramatists aware of Cervantes' novel?  This talk proposes that Quixote was known in England shortly after its 1605 publication and that the Spanish parody of chivalric romance played a part in the King's Men's turn to dramatic romance in PericlesCymbelineThe Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.

Valerie Wayne has edited or co-edited four books about Early Modern literature, most recently Staging Early Modern Romance (Routledge 2009) and Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford 2007).  She is a trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America and serves on the editorial board of Shakespeare Quarterly.

2008-2009:

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, 2008, 4-5:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Catherine Bates (English and Comparative Literary Studies, University of Warwick, UK) presents a lecture entitled: "Gascoigne's Prick." Prof. Bates works on the literature and culture of the Renaissance period, especially courtly poetry of the sixteenth century, and has interests in psychoanalysis and the epic tradition.  Her books include The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature (Cambridge, 1992); an edition of selected poems by Sir Philip Sidney (Penguin, 1994); Play in a Godless World: The Theory and Practice of Play in Shakespeare, Nietzsche and Freud (London, 1999), and, most recently, Masculinity, Gender and Identity in the English Renaissance Lyric (Cambridge, 2007), a study that looks at the gender construction of various "perverse" masculinities in the poetry of Sidney, Ralegh, Shakespeare, and Donne. Her next book is on alternative representations of masculinity and the literary motif of the hunt from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to The Faerie Queene, and she is currently editing The Cambridge Companion to Epic, due to be published in 2009. Please contact Rebecca Wiseman (rwiseman@umich.edu) or Kathryn Will (willkath@umich.edu) with questions.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2008, 10am-12pm, 3154 ANGELL HALL. Catherine Bates (Reader in Renaissance literature and Director of Graduate Stuides, University of Warwick, UK) leads a graduate student workshop that will focus on her precirculated article "George Turberville: The Man and His Birds." Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. For further information about the workshop, or to request an email copy, please contact Rebecca Wiseman at rwiseman@umich.edu.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH, 2009, 9:30am-6pm & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7th, 2009, 9am-6pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Conference: "The Religious Turn in Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies." Most broadly conceived, this two-day conference is about religion in the late medieval and early modern periods and our contemporary critical relationship to it. Not only do we intend this conference to deal with religion around the time of the Reformation -- both the tensions governing religious practice and the manifestation of those tensions in literature, art, music, and culture -- but we also hope to address methodologies for interpreting religion within and beyond historical paradigms.

Current historiography suggests a multiplicity of religions existing in late medieval and early modern Europe, in place of a binary between Catholicism and Protestantism. This multiplicity includes, but is not
limited to, Lollardy, mysticism, martyrology, female hagiography, particular religious formations within monasteries and convents, the Counter-Reformation, and the Puritan movement. Papers will address the implications of this view of late medieval and early modern religion. The Keynote Speakers for the conference are Sarah Beckwith (Duke University) and Arthur Marotti (Wayne State University).

This conference is free and open to the public. To see a listing of the full conference schedule, please click here. For questions or further information, please contact either Rebecca Wiseman (rwiseman@umich.edu), Kathryn Will (willkath@umich.edu) or Andrew Bozio (bozio@umich.edu).

2007-2008:

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th, 2007, 12-2pm, 3154 ANGELL HALL. Jean Howard (George Delacorto Professor in the Humanities, Department of English & Comparative Literature, Columbia University) leads a graduate student workshop on post-New Historicist critical approaches.  Is historicism dead?  What are some viable critical alternatives to New Historicism?  Our discussion will be informed by questions raised in a pre-circulated paper by Professor Howard.

This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Papers will be pre-circulated, with hard copies available in the English graduate student lounge (3rd Floor, Angell Hall) in a file cabinet marked "Early Modern Colloquium." For further information about the workshop, please contact Rebecca Wiseman at rwiseman@umich.edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15th, 2007, 5:00-6:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Jean Howard (George Delacorto Professor in the Humanities, Department of English & Comparative Literature, Columbia University) will give a talk entitled: "Beatrice's Monkey: Staging Exotica in Early Modern London Comedy." One of the leading feminist and historicist critics of her generation, Professor Howard has published widely on Shakespeare, Pope, Ford, Heywood, Dekker, Marston, and Jonson, as well as on aspects of contemporary critical theory including new historicism, Marxism, and issues in feminism. Please contact Amy Rodgers at ajrodger@umich.edu for additional information.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10th, 2008, 4-5:30pm, 3154 ANGELL HALL. Please join us for a dissertation workshop: "This Untoward Generation of Loose Libertines: Sexual Crime and Criminal Sexuality in Early Modern English Rogue Literature" by Ari Friedlander (English, University of Michigan). Why were petty criminals and vagrants depicted as sexual libertines in early modern popular literature? And what were the effects of this characterization? This chapter examines the figure of "the rogue" in early modern popular literature, arguing that the rogue's sexual desire is deployed to justify and explain his social marginality, identifying him not as an unfortunate victim of structural economic failure, but as a worthy target of moral censure and judicial discipline. For more information or to receive a precirculated copy of the chapter, please contact Rebecca Wiseman at rwiseman@umich.edu.

2006-2007:

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 2006, 4-6pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Patricia Fumerton (English, University of California, Santa Barbara) leads a graduate student workshop on popular print, broadside ballads, and digital archiving in early modern studies. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  The workshop is also being offered in conjunction with the Text Creation Partnership Project's conference "Bringing Text Alive: The Future of Scholarship, Pedagogy, and Electronic Publication" held on September 15-17. Participants should read Chapter 8 ("The Ballad's Seamen") of Fumerton's recent book, Unsettled: The Culture of Mobility and the Working Poor in Early Modern England. In addition, participants should browse the Pepys Ballad Archive website prior to attending the workshop: http://emc.english.ucsb.edu/ballad_project/images/index.asp . Please contact Laura Ambrose at lauraaw@umich.edu for more information.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9th, 2006, 9-11am, 3222 ANGELL HALL. MJ Kidnie (English, University of Western Ontario) and Carol Rutter (English, University of Warwick) lead a graduate student workshop that will consist of a discussion of selections from their current scholarly works-in-progress. Professors Kidnie and Rutter are both established scholars in the field of performance studies, and are here to participate in the "Watching Ourselves Watching Shakespeare" conference which will take place on November 10-11 in conjunction with the RSC residency. If you would like to receive copies of the readings electronically or further information about the workshop, please contact Amy Rodgers at ajrodger@umich.edu.

MONDAY, JANUARY 29th, 2007, 3-4:30pm, ENGLISH DEPARTMENT FACULTY LOUNGE (3rd FLOOR, ANGELL HALL). The EMC Graduate Student Spotlight focuses on Laura Ambrose, who will present her chapter, "Guiding Our 'Travails': Mapping Travel in Seventeenth-Century England," to workshop. Laura's dissertation is titled, Cultures & Representations of Local Travel in Early Modern England. Copies will be pre-circulated and are available via email. If you would like to receive a copy of the chapter electronically, or further information about the workshop, please contact Rebecca Wiseman at rwiseman@umich.edu.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 2007, 4:30-5:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Katharine Eisaman Maus (James Branch Cavell Professor of English and American Literature, University of Virginia) will give a talk entitled: "What's New About the New Organon: Bacon's Idol's in their Reformation Context." Author of Ben Jonson and the Roman Frame of Mind (1985) and Inwardness and Theater in the English Renaissance (1995), Maus' most recent work reconsiders scholarship on the history of subjectivity. Please contact Amy Rodgers at ajrodger@umich.edu for additional information.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2nd, 2007, 10am-12pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Katharine Eisaman Maus (English, University of Virginia) leads a graduate student workshop on the practice of scholarly editing. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only. Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. For further information about the workshop, please contact Amy Rodgers at ajrodger@umich.edu.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9th, 2007, 9am-5pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Conference: "Moving Texts: Manuscript & Print Culture, 1400-1700." Printed matter, literary and otherwise, traveled within communities and across continents during the medieval and early modern periods. How and why did manuscripts, books, pamphlets, dramatic literature, music, and other texts move between individuals and societies? What can our investigations of printing practices tell us about book use and material culture? Has print shaped history--or is it the reverse? This one-day interdisciplinary symposium will feature papers presented by graduate students and the work of Douglas Brooks (English, Texas A&M), Bradin Cormack (English, University of Chicago), Jonathan Zwicker (Asian Studies, University of Michigan), and Terri Tinkle (English, University of Michigan). To view the official Call for Papers, please go here. For further information or to submit a paper proposal, please contact Kathryn Will at willkath@umich.edu.

THURSDAY, MARCH 8th, 2007, 4-5pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL . Debora Shuger (English, UCLA) presents a talk, "The Reformation of Penance: Penitential Theology, Purgatory, and the Law in Early Modern England." A prolific writer, she is the author of Censorship and Cultural Sensibility: The Regulation of Language in Tudor-Stuart England (2006), Political Theologies in Shakespeare's England (2001), The Renaissance Bible (1994), Habits of Thought in the English Renaissance: Religion, Politics, and the Dominant Culture (1990), and Sacred Rhetoric (1988). She is also the co-editor of Religion and Culture in Renaissance England (1997). For more information about this event, please contact Jonathan Smith at jonws@umich.edu.

FRIDAY, MARCH 9th, 2007, 10am-12pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Debora Shuger (English, UCLA) leads a graduate student workshop that will discuss her recent, award-winning monograph, Censorship and Cultural Sensibility: The Regulation of Language in Tudor and Stuart England (2006). Participants are asked to read in advance the introduction and chapters seven and eight. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only. Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. For further information about the workshop, as well as electronic copies of the selected readings, please contact Jonathan Smith at jonws@umich.edu.

2005-2006:

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th, 2005, 2-3:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Mary Bly (English, Fordham University) presents a talk entitled, "Consuming London: Mapping Plays, Puns and Tourists in the Early Modern City." Her most recent book, Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans on the Early Modern Stage (Oxford, 2000), argues that communities of laughter created and, for the duration of a performance, consolidated an “erotic minority” that challenges our contemporary notions of identity and political collectives. For more information regarding this event, please contact Marjorie Rubright at mrubrigh@umich.edu.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th, 2005, 10am-12pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Mary Bly (English, Fordham University) leads a graduate student workshop on seventeenth-century city comedy. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Participants are encouraged to read in advance two articles available here. Hard copies are also available in the English Department Graduate Student Lounge (3rd floor, Angell Hall) in a file cabinet drawer marked "Early Modern Colloquium." Please contact Marjorie Rubright at mrubrigh@umich.edu for more information.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20th, 2005, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Frances Dolan (English, UC Davis) leads a graduate student workshop that will introduce strategies for researching early modern non-literary (legal and popular print) archives. Professor Dolan will also discuss her rigorously feminist, historical approach to the history of gender, religion and violence, which will have a broad appeal to students who share an interest in undertaking interdisciplinary work. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Please contact Laura Williamson (lauraaw@umich.edu) for more information.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2006, 2-4pm, 3156 ANGELL HALL. "Tips of the Trade: Researching Early Modern Archives." This symposium will gather graduate students, faculty and librarians from the Clements Library and Hatcher Graduate Library's Special Collections to develop a shared body of knowledge about how to do research in the archives. This will be a collective undertaking in which each participant offers a five-minute presentation on particular research strategies, and will share tips for researching at particular libraries. This event is part of Spotlight Symposia series, which offers graduate students a unique opportunity to gather the resources of the University of Michigan 's premodern faculty and graduate students, to present work-in-progress, and to share research strategies and knowledge. For more information regarding this event, please contact Kentston Bauman at baumank@umich.edu.

2004-2005:

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11th, 2004, 2-3pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Garett Sullivan (English, Penn State) presents “Sleep and Passions in Sir Philip Sidney's The Old Arcadia." Garrett Sullivan's most recent book is The Drama of Landscape: Land, Property, and Social Relations on the Early Modern Stage, which challenges the predominant definition of landscape that has derived from the landscape arts. Please contact Laura Williamson (lauraaw@umich.edu) for more information.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th, 2004, 10am-12pm, 806 HATCHER LIBRARY (MAP LIBRARY CONFERENCE ROOM). Garett Sullivan (English, Penn State) leads a graduate student workshop on Space and Geography in Early Modern England. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Precirculated readings are available in the English Department Graduate Student Lounge (3rd floor, Angell Hall) in a file cabinet drawer marked "Early Modern Colloquium." Please contact Laura Williamson (lauraaw@umich.edu) for more information.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18th, 2005, 9am-5pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. One-day graduate student conference: Medieval and Early Modern Spatial Epistemologies. Our 6th annual conference aims to foster interdisciplinary conversation about the various forms of spatial knowledge that emerge in the medieval and early modern periods. Click here to see the conference poster or click here to see the conference program and panel times. Please contact Kentston Bauman (baumank@umich.edu) for further information.

CANCELLED. THURSDAY, MARCH 10th, 2005, 2-3pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Mary Bly (English, Fordham University) presents a talk entitled, "Consuming London: Mapping Plays, Puns and Tourists in the Early Modern City." Her most recent book, Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans on the Early Modern Stage (Oxford, 2000), argues that communities of laughter created and, for the duration of a performance, consolidated an “erotic minority” that challenges our contemporary notions of identity and political collectives. For more information regarding this event, please contact Marjorie Rubright (mrubrigh@umich.edu).

CANCELLED. FRIDAY, MARCH 11th, 2005, 10am-12pm, 806 HATCHER LIBRARY (MAP LIBRARY CONFERENCE ROOM). Mary Bly (English, Fordham University) leads a graduate student workshop on seventeenth-century city comedy. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Participants should read in advance two articles available here. Hard copies available upon request. Please contact Marjorie Rubright (mrubrigh@umich.edu) for more information.

THURSDAY, APRIL 7th, 2005, 3-4pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Jacqueline Vanhoutte (English, North Texas) presents " 'She lingers my desires / like to a stepdame' : Elizabeth I, Surrogate Parenthood, and Political Tyranny." Vanhoutte's recent Strange Communion: Motherland and Masculinity in Tudor Plays, Pamphlets, and Politics interrogates the ways in which masculine authors depict England as a gendered nation. For more information regarding this event, please contact Chad Thomas (cathomas@umich.edu).

FRIDAY, APRIL 8th, 2005, 10am - 12pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Jacqueline Vanhoutte (English, North Texas) leads a graduate student workshop, on academic writing and publishing. This event is part of the Graduate Student Workshop series and is open to graduate students only.  Students from all departments are encouraged to attend. Precirculated readings are available in the English Department Graduate Student Lounge (3rd floor, Angell Hall) in a file cabinet drawer marked "Early Modern Colloquium." Please contact Chad Thomas (cathomas@umich.edu) for more information.

2003-2004:

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24th, 10am-12pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Carla Mazzio (University of Chicago) presents "The Three-Dimensional Self: Geometry, Melancholy, Drama." Please join us as for a pre-circulated presentation of work from Carla Mazzio (University of Chicago), former member of the Michigan Society of Fellows, co-editor of Body in Parts: Fantasies of Corporeality in Early Modern Europe, and author of articles on language, print, and the tongue.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21st, 12-2pm, OSTERMAN ROOM, INSTITUTE FOR THE HUMANITIES, 0520 RACKHAM BUILDING. Professor Peter Holland (Notre Dame) presents "Theatre Without Drama: Reading REED (Records in Early English Drama)." Professor Holland is the former Judith E. Wilson Reader in Drama and Theatre at the University of Cambridge (1996-7), former director of the Shakespeare Institute at University of Birmingham (1997-2002), and author of English Shakespeares: Shakespeare on the English Stage in the 1990s, as well as numerous articles on Renaissance drama in performance.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 16th, 9am-5pm, KALAMAZOO ROOM, MICHIGAN LEAGUE. Conference: Premodern Bodies and the Wünderkammer of Queer Objects. This one-day conference rethinks histories of sexuality, gender, and the premodern body by exploring the wide variety of ways that desire -- for love, sex, money, status -- coalesced around its virtual and supplemental parts, such as relics, statues, sacred and secular images, blood, beards, dildos, perfume, skin, and certain articles of clothing.

FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 2004, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Tricia McElroy presents "Creating Mary Queen of Scots: Strategies of Representation in Sixteenth-Century Scotland." This talk is part of our ongoing series featuring graduate student work. Tricia McElroy, a graduate student at Oxford University and lecturer at the University of Michigan, is currently finishing work on her dissertation. To obtain a copy of this pre-circulated paper, please contact Laura Williamson: lauraaw@umich.edu.

TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2004, 4-6pm, OSTERMAN ROOM, INSTITUTE FOR THE HUMANITIES, 0520 RACKHAM BUILDING. John N. King (Ohio State), the Humanities Distinguished Professor of English & Religious Studies at Ohio State, author of the influential English Reformation Literature, and editor of several critical modern volumes of Renaissance texts, presents "Foxe's Book of Martyrs: The History of a Book and the History of the Book."

2002-2003:

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th, 2:30-3:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Michael Murrin (University of Chicago) will present his new work, "A Romance Version of the Spice Route Before the Portuguese Discovery: Huon of Bordeaux and its Commercial Context." Co-sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25th, 2-4pm, 1014 TISCH HALL. Professor Richard Rambuss (Emory University) will present a lecture entitled "What it Feels Like for a Boy: Shakespeare's Adonis." Sponsored by Medieval and Early Modern Studies and the Lesbian-Gay-Queer Research Initiative (LGQRI).

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th, 12-2pm, PENDLETON ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION. Professor James Shapiro (Columbia University) will present his new work entitled "Jessica, the Jew's Daughter." Co-sponsored by the Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th, 9:30am-5:30pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Conference: Reinventing Early Modern Technologies. This one-day conference will explore the status of early modern technological innovations as it seeks to recast previous discussions about fields such as artillery, metallurgy, alchemy, medicine, gardening, and navigation by blurring the commonplace distinctions between the old and the new, the elite and the popular, the theoretical and the practical, and the scientific and the magical. Read the conference program here.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7th, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Arthur Marotti (Wayne State University) will present a talk entitled "The Personal Anthology of Poetry in Manuscript in Early Modern England."

THURSDAY, MARCH 6th, 4-6pm, Lane Hall, Seminar Rooms A and B. Professor Elizabeth Harvey (University of Toronto) will present a talk entitled "Lethe's Body: Forgetting Sex in Early Modern Medicine and Literature." Co-sponsored by the Institute for Research on Women and Gender.

2001-2002:

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 12-2pm, 1014 TISCH HALL. Professor Richard Rambuss (Emory University) will present his new work titled, "Hating the Metaphysicals: Crashaw, Serrano, and Ofili." Co-sponsored by Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th, 12-2pm, 1014 TISCH HALL. Professor Douglous Biow (University of Texas) will present his new work titled, "Three Reactions to Plague: Marvels and Commonplaces in Medicine and Literature." Co-sponsored by Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th, 1-3pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Richard Firth Green (University of Western Ontario) will present his new work on medieval literature and the law. Sponsored by Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25th, 9am-5pm, MICHIGAN LEAGUE, HUSSEY ROOM. Conference: Changing States: Travel and Conversion in the Early Modern Period. This one-day, faculty and graduate student conference will explore issues of religion and global contact in the early modern period, and interrogate the relationship between European colonialism and conversion in the New World and in the East. This conference seeks to gather together a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches to generate an interdisciplinary conversation about the nature of crossing religious, political, social, economic, and geographic boundaries.

Conference participants include Mary Fuller (MIT), Daniel Vitkus (FSU), Jonathan Burton (WVU), Gerald Maclean (Wayne State), Jyotsna Singh (MSU), Maureen Ahern (OSU), Linda Gregerson (English, UM), Diane Hughes (History, UM), Jennie Evenson (English, UM), and Erika Gasser (History, UM), and Steven Mullaney (English, UM). Click here to see the conference program.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8th, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Professor Michael MacDonald (University of Michigan) will present his new work, "Interpretation of Dreams in Early Modern England." Co-sponsored by the Department of History.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15th, 12-2pm, 1014 TISCH HALL. Professor Leah Marcus (Vanderbilt) will present her new work titled "Reading Elizabeth Writing." Co-sponsored by Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15th, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Symposium: Legal Ways of Knowing in Early Modern Europe. This panel on early modern literature and law will feature Barbara Shapiro and Luke Wilson.

2000-2001:

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12th, 2000, 4-6pm, WOLVERINE ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION. Richard Strier (University of Chicago) presents a talk titled, "Shakespeare and Skepticism." Reception to follow.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th, 200012-2 PM, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Ania Loomba (University of Illinois) presents a talk entitled, "Shakespeare and Postcolonial Authenticity." Organized by MEMS.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17th, 2000, 12-2pm, KUENZEL ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION. Panel : Climate Theory, Race, and Physiology: Rethinking the History of Science. Participants include, Valerie Traub (University of Michigan), Panel Chair; Mary Floyd-Wilson (Yale University), "Strong Limbs and Spongy Brains: The Ethnography of English Humoralism"; Ian MacInnes (Albion College), "'The men do sympathize with the mastiffs': Animal Physiology, Climate Theory, and English National Identity"; and Scotti Parrish (University of Michigan), "Poisoned Knowledge and the Curious Body in America"

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1st, 2000, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Jonathan Gil Harris (Ithaca) presents, "Shakespeare's Hair: The New New Historicism's Wunderkammer of Objects."

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19th, 2001, 9:00am-5:30pm, ANDERSON ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION. Conference: New Formalisms and the Lyric in History. This one-day conference will explore new approaches to form in studies of the lyric in a range of historical periods.

Keynote Speakers: Heather Dubrow (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Marjorie Levinson (University of Michigan). Participants include: Sadia Abbas (UM), Tim Bahti (UM), Angela Balla (UM), Elise Frasier (UM), Linda Gregerson (UM), Carla Mazzio (UM), Adela Pinch (UM), Yopie Prins (UM), James Schiffer (Northern Michigan University), Michael Schoenfeldt (UM), Richard Strier (University of Chicago), and Amanda Watson (UM). The conference is free and open to the public. Click here to view the conference program.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16th, 2001, 12-2pm, CLEMENTS LIBRARY. Caroline Walker Bynum (Columbia University), gives a talk, "The Bodies and Bloods of Christ in the Middle Ages: An Asymmetry." Organized by Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Reception to follow.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19th, 2001, 4-8:30pm, RACKHAM AUDITORIUM. Shakespeare Lectures in anticipation of the Royal Shakespeare Company Visit to Ann Arbor. Part I (4-6:30pm): Stephen Greenblatt (Harvard University) presents a talk, "Dreams of Kingship: Ghostly Terror in Shakespeare's Richard III." Part II (7-8:30pm): Ralph Williams (University of Michigan) presents, "God say Amen: Richard III."

FRIDAY, MARCH 23rd, 2001, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Panel: Contemporary Approaches to Drama. Short precirculated papers by Sabiha Ahmad, Holly Dugan, Jennie Evenson, and Maureen McDonnell (doctoral candidates at the University of Michigan).

MONDAY, APRIL 2nd, 2001, 4-6pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Andrew Murphy (University of St. Andrews, Scotland) presents a talk, "Caviare to the general": Shakespeare and Popular Print." Co-sponsored with MEMS.

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 2001, 12-2pm, RACKHAM ASSEMBLY HALL, FOURTH FLOOR. Symposium: Unfamiliar Paradigms: Gender and Domesticity Inside-Out. Participants include Wendy Wall (Northwestern University), "Canning and the Uncanny," and Dympna Callaghan (Syracuse University), "The Lover's Complaint."

1999-2000:

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 1999, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Linda Gregerson (University of Michigan) presents a talk, "Staging the Text."

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29th, 1999, 2-4pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Margreta deGrazia (University of Pennsylvania), presents "World History and Hamlet."

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th, 1999, 12-2pm, OSTERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM (1524 RACKHAM). Panel: Historicizing Passions. Chair: Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan). Speakers: Elise Frasier (University of Michigan), Jane Tylus (University of Wisconsin), Michael Schoenfeldt (University of Michigan).

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10th, 1999, 12-2pm, OSTERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM (1524 RACKHAM). Carla Mazzio (University of Michigan) presetnes a talk, "Renaissance Self-Fractioning: Mathematics, Melancholy, and Literary Form."

SATURDAY, JANUARY 29th, 2000, 8:30am-5:00pm & SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th, 2000, 8:30am-1:30pm. Conference: On Religious Grounds: From Discipline to Disciplinarity in Medieval and Early Modern Studies. How might we understand the recent resurgence of interest in religion in a number of disciplines within the humanities? This conference will draw together key scholars in medieval and early modern studies working on music, literature, historical narrative, philosophy, and the visual arts to discuss their work on histories and practices of shared belief.

Participants include: Julia Adams (University of Michigan), Sarah Beckwith (Duke University), Gina Bloom (Univeristy of Michigan), James Borders (University of Michigan), Catherine Brown (University of Michigan), Celeste Brusati (University of Michigan), David Cressy (Ohio State), Diane Hughes (University of Michigan), Lori Anne Ferrell (Claremont), Johnathan Freedman (University of Michigan), Elliot Ginsburg (University of Michigan), Linda Gregerson (University of Michigan), Elizabeth Ingram (Eastern Michigan), Ashby Kinch (University of Michigan), John Knott (University of Michigan), Arthur Marotti (Wayne State), Carla Mazzio (University of Michigan), Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan), Chris Olberding (University of Michigan), Sara Rubinstein (University of Michigan), Michael Schoenfeldt (University of Michigan), Debora Shuger (University of California, Los Angeles), Pat Simons (University of Michigan), Louise Stein (University of Michigan), Peter Stallybrass (University of Pennsylvania), Amanda Watson (University of Michigan), Jack Williamson (University of Michigan). The program for the conference is available here.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17th, 2000, 4-6pm, OSTERMAN CONFERENCE ROOM (1524 RACKHAM). Stephen Orgel (Stanford University), gives a talk entited, "Tobacco and Boys, Or How Queer was Marlowe?"

THURSDAY, MARCH 17th, 2000, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Marjorie Garber (Harvard University), presents a talk, "Historical Correctness."

THURSDAY, APRIL 13th, 2000, 4-6pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Symposium: Geography, Ethnicity, and the Question of Orientation, Part I: Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan) presents "Colonizing Consciousness: Technologies of Affect and the Colonial Mirror Stage."

FRIDAY, APRIL 14th, 2000, 12-2pm, 3222 ANGELL HALL. Symposium: Geography, Ethnicity, and the Question of Orientation, Part II. Panel: chair, Valerie Traub (University of Michigan). Speakers: Jennie Evenson (University of Michigan), "Wonders of the Bounty: Plenitude and Diversity in Mandeville's Travels"; Jyotsna G. Singh (Michigan State), "Disorientations of Nation-formation: The 'Discovery' of England in Travel Narratives of Edward Terry's Voyage to East India (1655)"; Goran Stanivukovic (St. Mary's University, Halifax), "Erotic Ethnography: Renaissance Romances and Geographies of the Eastern Mediterranean."


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