*PAMELA!*PEACHUM!*JONATHAN SWIFT!*MACHEATH!*BELINDA!*PINCHWIFE!*AND MORE!*

Even in the rough stages of advertising in the eighteenth century, shrewd marketers had the insight to realize that fame influenced sales. One of the most popular forms of advertising for quack doctors was the testimonial method. Persons such as Tiddy Doll, the gingerbread seller, practically became household names (1). Appeals were often made to high-ranking figures whose names everyone recognized, such as "his majesty." In an age that was known for its sociability, the eighteenth century had a remarkable amount of advertising based upon the premise that people were more likely to buy from someone they felt they would know individually. Patrons actually expected to see the owner of the store behind the desk and serving them (2). No attempt was made to distance the potential buyer from the product by covering up the familiar, non-bureaucratic feel of the early days of trade. Goods, particulary books, were generally advertised as being by a specific person, for a specific person. Advertisements directed the reader to pick up the product at a specific location, and sometimes even during specific hours on a specific day.

But enough of this background information. We know that what you are really here for is to learn about what your favorite literature stars have to say about their likes (and dislikes)! We have taken the following opportunity to interview our eighteenth-century stars, asking them to choose an advertisement that they found especially appealing (by circling it in red ink) and reflect on why they would make this emotional choice.

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*PAMELA! (from Samuel Richardson's Pamela) Picks:
"The Instructive Letter Writer" and "Sermons to Young Women"

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"Dear Sir:

I had a difficult time in deciding which article I liked best; so I settled for the best of both worlds by choosing them both. I would be very interested in "The Instructive Letter Writer." I write letters constantly, but of course, there is always room for improvement, especially as nowdays I write more for other people's pleasures than I do for my own. I am especially intrigued by the feature on 'directions how to address persons of all ranks,' for this is a particular concern of mine as I was used to writing only for my humble parents, but now that I have married above myself, I must address much higher class persons. They are relying on me to be perfect in all things. "Sermons to Young Women" sounded equally enticing. The author has already written sermons on subjects of great interest to me, such as 'The Temple of Virtue' and 'The Character and Conduct of the Female Sex, and the advantages to be derived by young Men from the Society of virtuous Women.'

Your dutious, Pamela"

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*PEACHUM! (from Samuel Gay's The Beggar's Opera) Eyes:
"Briscoe and Morrison: Jewlers and Goldsmiths"

(5) "I go for the money of course. Naturally, if everyone was as honest as I was, and understood the way of the world, they would too. Not that I would actually purchase anything here...no, I would bring my 'purchases' here in exchange for 'the utmost value' of 'ready money'...I tell you, it all goes back to the pounds."

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*JONATHON SWIFT! (of A Tale of a Tub fame) Chooses:
"The Roman History" and "The History of Ancient Greece"

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"I rely heavily on ancient Greek and Roman knowledge for my allusions in my writings. A Tale of a Tub, for example, is about 1/8th Latin. I must understand these ancient cultures in order to express my full message (wink, wink)."

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*MACHEATH! (from Samuel Gay's The Beggar's Opera) Needs:
"Jamaica Rum"

"Yes, I need this Jamaica Rum. It is, after all, as the advertisement says, 'a large Quantity of very Strong' liquor... so I know it will give me a large quantity of very strong courage! I rely on this stuff to pull me through the hard times. Once, when I was sentenced to death, it was my only comfort. Come sing with me...

'But now again my spirits sink;
I'll raise them high with wine.
But valor the stronger grows,
The stronger liquor we're drinking.
And how can we feel our woes,
When we've left the trouble of thinking?
If this, --a man can die.
Much bolder with brandy.
So I drink off this bumper.
--And now I can stand the test.
And my comrades shall see that I die as brave as the best(8).' "
(9)
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*BELINDA! (from Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock) Snubs:
"A Pig in A Poke"
(10) "(Sigh) Now that a lock of my precious hair has been cut off and granted to the stars above, I have only my body to speak of my beauteous glory, and ah! what a glory it is! (or so I've been told). When I look at this advertisement, I just know that it is targeting me, and I am enraged: How dare it try to better God's decisions! My body is all natural and God-given. I do not need false breasts and buttocks to improve my delicious curves. Neither do you. I advice any woman who feels inadequate about her body to think twice about purchasing such falsies. You will waste your money. Take it from my voice of wisdom: there are some people in this world who were just not meant to be attractive."

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*PINCHWIFE! (from William Wycherley's The Country Wife) Avoids:
"Horses By Private Sale"

"This article might sound captivating to some people, such as foolish Goldsmith, who believes that the secluded country community is everything and that the city is corrupting. I myself, many years ago, when I knew nothing of how the world works, thought the same. But the brutal reality is that the article is ONE GIANT LIE. Do not get carried away by a description of horses from the countryside that are 'uncommon,' have 'superior figures,' and are 'steady to ride.' The secludedness of the country does not produce any type of animal-- horse or man-- who fits the description of being 'perfectly sound, free from vice or blemish.' Ha! Free from vice or blemish! All lies. For one's honor, it is best to avoid these horses at all costs. They shall only disappoint you." (11)

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*AND MORE! Clips from the Public Advertiser, starring the works of writers Gay, Goldsmith, Richardson, and Johnson...don't miss out, purchase a copy for yourself today!!!

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