University Lowbrow Astronomers

University Lowbrow Astronomers
Database of Telescopic Objects

Database of Suggested Telescopic Objects
by Brian Ottum

The following is a database of 1867 objects that can be seen through small telescopes, it includes galaxies, single stars, double stars, multiple stars and nebulae.  It is mainly intended for telescope observers with mechanical setting circles or electronic equivalents (such as NGC-MAX and similar devices).  It will be less useful for observers who rely on star hopping.

Follow this link to download a copy of the database.

Note: You must have Microsoft Excel to view this database.  Depending on how your web browser is set up, you may be asked to locate a copy of Microsoft Excel on your computer.  It may automatically open the database or offer to save a copy to your hard disk.  The file is 368K and may take a few moments to download (especially on a slow modem).

We suggest you save the database to your hard drive.  Once you have done so, you can view it anytime you wish.  You will find the database is sorted by constellation and then RA within each constellation.  You can change how the database is sorted, in particular you can

Each row in the database is a different object; the columns of the database are as follows:

# a identification number of the object (such as M51).

Type

the type of object (such as galaxy, nebulae, etc).

Mag

the magnitude of the object.

Name

either common name or an alternative identification number for the object.

Size

the size of the object.

Con

the constellation where the object is located.

RA hr

the location (the right ascension in hours).

RA min

the location (the right ascension in minutes).

DEC deg

the location (the declination in degrees).

DEC min

the location (the declination in minutes).

Comments

comments about the object.

Rating.


Abbreviations used in the database are as follows:

ab about

alm

almost

am

among

annul

annular or ring neb

att

attached

b

brighter

bet

between

bf

brightest to f side

biN

binuclear

bn

brightest to n side

bp

brightest to p side

bs

brightest to s side

B

bright

c

considerably

chev

chevelure

co

coarse, coarsely

com

cometary form

comp

companion

conn

connected

cont

in contact

C

compressed

Cl

cluster

d

diameter

def

defined

dif

diffused

diffic

difficult

dist

distance or distant

D

double

e

extremely, excessively

ee

most extremely

er

easily resolvable

exc

excentric

E

extended

f

following (eastward)

F

faint

g

gradually

glob.

globular

gr

group

i

irregular

inv

involved, involving

iF

irregular figure

l

little (adv.); long (adj.)

L

large

m

much

m

magnitude

M

middle or in the middle

n

north

neb

nebula

nebs

nebulous

neby

nebulosity

nf

north following

np

north preceding

nr

near

ns

north-south

N

nucleus, or to a nucleus

p

preceding (westward)

p

pretty (adv., before F. B. L, S)

pf

preceding-following

pg

pretty gradually

plan

planetary nebula (same as PN)

pm

pretty much

ps

pretty suddenly

prob

probably

P

poor (sparse) in stars

PN

planetary nebula

r

resolvable (mottled, not resolved)

rr

partially resolved

rrr

well resolved, clearly stars

R

round

Ri

rich in stars

RR

exactly round

s

suddenly (abruptly)

s

south

sc

scattered

sev

several

sf

south following

sp

south preceding

st

stars (pl.)

st 9...

stars of 9th magnitude and fainter

st 9..13

stars of mag. 9 to 13

stell

stellar, pointlike

susp

suspected

S

small in angular size

S*

small (faint) star

trap

trapezium

triangle

triangle, forms a triangle with

triN

trinuclear

v

very

vv

very

var

variable

*

a single star

*10

a star of 10th magnitude

*7-8

star of mag. 7 or 8

**

double star (same as D*)

***

triple star

!

remarkable

!!

very much so

!!!

a magnificent object

A, dbl Asterism or dbls

B

Milky Way Patch

BN, Nb

Bright Nebula (Diffuse)

C,N

Cluster and Neb (Diffuse)

Dbl

Binary Star

DblQ

Quadruple Star

DblT

Triple Star

DN

Dark Nebula

EG

Elliptical Galaxy

EN

Emission Neb (Diffuse)

G, Gx

Galaxy

GC

Globular Cluster

IG

Irregular Galaxy

LG

Lenticular (S0) Galaxy

OC

Open Cluster

PN, Pl

Planetary Nebula

Qu

Quasar

RN

Reflection Neb (Diffuse)

SG

Spiral Galaxy

SN

Supernova Remnant

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Copyright © 2014, the University Lowbrow Astronomers. (The University Lowbrow Astronomers are an amateur astronomy club based in Ann Arbor, Michigan).
This page revised Sunday, March 9, 2014 4:30 PM.
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