University Lowbrow Astronomers

The Further Adventures of Amateur Astronomers and Jr. Lowbrow’s.

by George W. Ferrier
Printed in Reflections: August, 2008.

After several nights of the sky being overcast or having a magnitude of 2 or 1, we spent a lot of time studying types of clusters, and the life of stars.

On July 4th we were able to watch the following satellites: at 2224hrs MetOp-A; and at 2243hrs Envisat passed at 65° overhead passing SSE to ENE for 3 minutes at a magnitude of 3.0. There were four of us viewing this.

On July 5th 1040 P.M. we did some 7x50 binocular viewing of Arcturus and Saturn and Mars. I had four adults and five children with me. The sky was at magnitude 6 and we were able to make out six stars of Ursa Minor’s little dipper.

On July 6th 10:30 P.M. we again viewed Saturn at 4.3 magnitude, Mars at 2 magnitude & Regulus at 4 magnitude.

3 Day old Waxing Crescent

Saturn, Mars and Regulus

Saturn, Mars and Regulus

July 6, 2008—3 day old,Waxing Crescent

July 15th I was out with three children & four adults looking at Scorpius with Binoculars and we were looking at Antares, Alpha Sco, Beta Sco and just scanning the area. I viewed two bright stars about 10° South East of Beta Sco and observed a gray Fuzzy Glow around them. Of course the kids asked what that was so I looked in my library. I thought it may be M80 but some books says it’s not visible thru Binoculars so I thought it was the double below Beta Sco W1 & W2. But doing a search on the net (see picture) I found a shot of M80 with 2 bright stars so I am assuming what we saw was M80.

M80

M80

July 15, 2008—12 day old, Waxing Gibbous

July 15, 2008—12 day old, Waxing Gibbous

July 23rd I had 6 others with me and we used the 4 1/2” Newtonian telescope and viewed Jupiter. We could not see any details of the surface due to Jupiter’s Brightness -2.7, but the four moons were in line with each other. I don’t know if it was because of the atmosphere or if I need a filter, maybe someone will help us. I think it’s because Jupiter was so high it is reflecting more of the Sun.

Callisto, Ganymede, Io, Europa

Callisto, Ganymede, Io, Europa

July 23, 2008—20 day old, Waning Gibbous

July 23, 2008—20 day old, Waning Gibbous

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This page originally appeared in Reflections of the University Lowbrow Astronomers (the club newsletter).
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