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MCTP
3444 Randall Lab
450 Church Street
Ann Arbor MI, 48109
PH:734-763-9698
Fx:734-763-2213
mctp@umich.edu


MCTP Public Lectures
In keeping with its interdisciplinary mission, the MCTP hosts not-so-technical Public Lectures designed to help us learn more about what our colleagues in other fields are doing. Refreshments are served beforehand.

Thursday, October 9, 2008
340 West hall, 7:00 pm
Will Kinney, Asst Professor of Physics (University of Buffalo)

"The End of the Universe and the Future of Life"
Recent developments in cosmology have not only shed new light on the beginning of the Universe: they have also changed our speculations about how the Universe may end in the far future. Chief among these new discoveries is the observation that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, indicating that the Universe will end not in a “Big Crunch”, but in an ever-faster rush of expansion. In the context of this new cosmology, I will revisit the famous argument first made by Freeman Dyson in 1979 that life in an expanding universe has a limitless future. The reality for the future of evolution is more complex than Dyson envisioned.

March 27, 2008
1400 Chemistry Bldg at 7:00PM (Refreshments will be available)
Jonathan I Lunine (University of Arizona, Tucson) Professor of Planetary Science and Physics

"Exploring the Outer Solar System: Present and Future"
With the Cassini mission moving into its extended phase, it is time to consider the next steps in exploring the diverse worlds around Jupiter and Saturn – and beyond. This part of our solar system is active, diverse, and might hold clues to whether life is a cosmic imperative.

May 7, 2007
Gregory Laughlin (University of California, Santa Cruz)

"Alien Solar Systems - Taking the Galactic Planetary Census"
In the past decade, over two hundred planets have been discovered in orbit around nearby stars. The current planetary census includes bizarre "hot Jupiters", massive "Eccentric Giants", as well as objects that closely resemble the more familiar Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune in our own solar system. Within 5 years, we will likely know of planets with masses as low as one Earth mass. In this lecture, I'll give an accessible overview of the most exciting developments in this fast-moving field, and I will point the way toward the even more astonishing discoveries that are likely soon to come.

This public lecture will take place during the Annual AAS Meeting of the Division on Dynamcial Astronomy May 6-10th, 2007

April 9, 2007
Joel R. Primack, Nancy Ellen Abrams

"Public Lecture: The View from the Center of the Universe"
The View from the Center of the Universe presents new ways of wrapping our minds around the universe, and does so without math or jargon, so that we can all take part in this extraordinary revolution. The book helps launch what will be a great cultural task: developing language and imagery that we can all use to grasp our universe viscerally, to talk about it accurately, and to appreciate what a new universe may mean for our personal lives and for our planet. Please join the conversation!

January 17, 2006
S. James Gates, Jr.
John S. Toll Professor of Physics and Center for String and Particle Theory Director
(University of Maryland)


"Concerto-I and Opus by A. Einstein"
Einstein once asked, "How can it be that mathematics, being the product of human thought independent of experience, is so admirably adapted to the objects of reality?" Yet for most people, mathematics is a daunting language unpleasant to even contemplate. There now exists an instrument on which mathematics can be ?played? much as a score can be played on a piano. In this talk, a performance of an Einstein Concerto and Opus are given using this instrument. The instrument is called a computer. talk, a performance of an Einstein Concerto and Opus are given using this instrument. The instrument is called a computer.

gates

May 18, 2004
Mark Trodden (Syracuse University)

"The New Cosmology and its Challenge to Fundamental Physics"
Professor Mark Trodden of Syracuse University will give a public lecture describing the problems for fundamental physics theory posed by our new understanding of the contents of the universe. A series of remarkable experiments completed over the last decade provides convincing evidence that the universe is roughly 4% ordinary matter (the stuff of the periodic table), 26% dark matter (the nature of which is mostly unknown), and 70% dark energy (the nature of which is almost completely unknown). Professor Trodden will describe how each provides challenges to particle physics - highlighting the current connections and our hopes for the future.

April 16, 2004
Paul Davies,
Professor of Natural Philosophy, Australian Centre for Astrobiology,
(Macquarie University, NSW Australia)

"Did Life Come From Mars?"
The origin of life remains one of the great outstanding problems of science. It affects such big questions as whether or not we are alone in the universe, and the place of humanity in the great cosmic scheme. For some years, internationally-acclaimed physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist and writer Paul Davies has championed the theory that life may have started on Mars on come to Earth ready-made, hitching a ride in rocks blasted from the Red Planet by comet impacts. In his lecture, Davies will explain why Mars was a more favorable environment for life to get started, and why it may still harbor life today.

 

daviss

March 16, 2001
Michael Duff
Oskar Klein Professorship Inaugural Lecture

"The World In Eleven Dimensions"
Current attempts to find a unified theory that would reconcile Einstein's General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, and explain all known physical phenomena, invoke the Kaluza-Klein idea of extra spacetime dimensions. The best candidate is M-theory which lives in eleven dimensions, the maximum allowed by supersymmetry of the elementary particles.

 

 

 

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